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Chocolate Flying Machines

Toblerones are a very Christmassy thing, and I got a drone last week. The Tello drone is controllable from Scratch… and Makey Makey. I’ve been looking for a way to combine it with Makey. I bring you Tobledrone – the edible drone controller.

A Makey Makey Labz guide is in the works.

Countdown 2019

Quick post about numbers. Back in 2017, @aap03102 asked me if I could write a program to insert basic operators into a string of numbers, e.g.

1 + 2 – 3 + 4 ÷ 5 …

We were trying to find 10,958, which is the only ‘gap’ between 0 and 11111 if worked out this way (work of Inder Taneja - see this link). The closest we got was 1.2 + ((3/4) ^ (5 – (6 x 7 x (8/9))) = 10958.052439016.

I remembered this today when I saw 2019 countdowns, so started up the Discombobulator and Number Tokenizer (couldn’t think of a good name) and found this – plus 1930 other results (there’s a bit of overlap with redundant brackets that I couldn’t be bothered filtering out).

2019

Anyway, download link for the program is here: discombobulator

Source code (Visual Studio project): discombob_source

Makey Makey Featured Guide: Walk-on Maze

I’ve always felt interactive programmable floor mazes were just too… static. So why not make one you can take with you?! Actually, I just use multiple classrooms, so it was easiest to make a roll-up portable version that could be moved between rooms when we were working on it.

I’m pretty chuffed that my maze remix is featured and has been taken as the #CSEdWeek Hour of Code Challenge Day 3 by Makey Makey – and they made blog post about it.

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This is a take on the Makey Makey Journey, whereby two people walk along a conductive path – holding hands – to control a computer game. We made our own version with tinfoil tape (becoming one of my favourites) and plastic outdoor sheeting.

Testing_1

One path is wired to the Earth terminal, and the other to Space. The connection was a bit ropey at first, but we managed to find where it was dropping off and added some booster wires.

We used Scratch to make a circus game with a tightrope-walker and big top music. The featured guide is on Labz and Twitter, and explains it best. This includes a (hopefully funny) video.

Now, I’m away to frame my maze and stick it on a (large) wall in my parents’ house.

Maths Week: Binary Game (update)

Video and full instructions for the Makey Makey binary game.

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